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Central Florida HIFU Care | Prostate Cancer Treatment

 

Abdomen:
Also referred to as the belly. It is the part of the body that contains all of the internal structures between the chest and the pelvis.

Ablation:
Removal of diseased or unwanted tissue from the body by surgery or other means.

Abnormality:
A variation from a normal structure or function of the body.

Abscess:
An accumulation of pus anywhere in the body.

Adjuvant:
A drug or agent added to another drug, agent, or other treatment to enhance its medical effectiveness.

Androgen:
Male sex hormone.

Anesthesia:
Loss of sensation in any part of the body induced by a numbing or paralyzing agent. Often used during surgery to put a person to sleep.

Antibiotic:
Drug that kills bacteria or prevents them from multiplying.

Anus:
Opening at the end of the digestive tract where feces (stool) leave the body. The final two inches of the rectum.

Apical:
Used to describe the top of something.

Bacteria:
Single-celled microorganisms that can exist independently (free-living) or dependently upon another organism for life (parasite). They can cause infection and are usually treated with antibiotics.

Benign:
Not malignant; not cancerous.

Biopsies:
Tiny pieces of body parts are removed with a needle or during surgery and examined under a microscope to determine if cancer or other abnormal cells are present.

Biopsy:
A procedure in which a tiny piece of a body part (tissue sample), such as the kidney or bladder, is removed (with a needle or during surgery) for examination under a microscope; to determine if cancer or other abnormal cells are present.

Bladder:
The balloon-shaped pouch of thin, flexible muscle in which urine is temporarily stored before being discharged through the urethra.

Bonescan:
A nuclear image of the skeleton.

Bowel:
Another word for intestines or colon.

Bowel movement:
The act of passing feces (stool) through the anus.

Brachytherapy:
Treatment for prostate cancer that involves the placement of tiny radioactive pellets into the prostate by utilizing ultrasound.

Cancer:
An abnormal growth that can invade nearby structures and spread to other parts of the body and may be a threat to life.

Capillaries:
Thin blood vessels.

Catheter:
A thin tube that is inserted through the urethra into the bladder to allow urine to drain or for performance of a procedure or test, such as insertion of a substance during a bladder X-ray.

Cellular:
Relating to small parts or groups.

Chemotherapy:
Treatment with medications that kill cancer cells or stop them from spreading.

Continence:
The ability to control the timing of urination or a bowel movement.

Corpora:
Plural of corpus. The main portion of something, such as an organ or other body part, or a mass of tissue with a distinct function.

Cryotherapy:
During an operation, probes are placed in the prostate. The probes are frozen thus killing the prostatic cells.

CT scan:
Also known as computerized tomography, computerized axial tomography or CT scan. A diagnostic imaging procedure that uses a combination of X-rays and computer technology to produce cross-sectional images of the body. Shows detailed images of any part of the body, including bones, muscles, fat and organs. CT scans are more detailed than general X-rays.

Cutaneous:
Relating to the skin.

Cyst:
An abnormal sac containing gas, fluid or a semisolid material. Cysts may form in kidneys or other parts of the body.

Cystoscope:
A narrow, tube-like instrument fitted with lenses and a light passed through the urethra to look inside the bladder. The procedure is called cystoscopy (sis-TAW-skuh-pee).

Diabetes:
A medical disorder that can cause kidney failure.

Digital rectal examination:
Also known as DRE. Insertion of a gloved, lubricated finger into the rectum to feel the prostate and check for any abnormalities.

Dilate:
Widen.

Diminished:
Made or became smaller

DNA:
Also known as deoxyribonucleic acid. A molecule in the form of a twisted double strand that is the major component of chromosomes and carries genetic information.

DRE:
Also known as digital rectal examination. Insertion of a gloved, lubricated finger into the rectum to feel the prostate and check for any abnormalities.

EBRT:
Also known as external beam radiation therapy. This technique involves directing a beam of radiation from outside the body focused on the cancerous internal organ and/or tissue within the body.

ED:
Also known as erectile dysfunction or impotence. The inability to get or maintain an erection for satisfactory sexual intercourse.

Ejaculation:
Release of semen from the penis during sexual climax (orgasm).

Erectile:
Capable of filling with blood under pressure, swelling and becoming stiff.

Erectile dysfunction:
Also known as ED or impotence. The inability to get or maintain an erection for satisfactory sexual intercourse. Also called impotence.

Erection:
Enlargement and hardening of the penis caused by increased blood flow into the penis and decreased blood flow out of it as a result of sexual excitement.

External beam radiation therapy:
Also known as EBRT. This technique involves directing a beam of radiation from outside the body focused on the cancerous internal organ and/or tissue within the body.

External beam radiation:
Radiation focused from a source outside the body on the affected area within the body.

Fistula:
An abnormal opening between two organs (between the bladder and vagina in women or the bladder and the rectum in men).

Gas:
gaseous state; sometimes refers to flatus or bowel gas

Gene:
The basic unit capable of transmitting characteristics from one generation to the next.

Gland:
A mass of cells or an organ that removes substances from the bloodstream and excretes them or secretes them back into the blood with a specific physiological purpose.

Gleason Score:
Used in the Gleason grade system which is the most common system used in the United States to grade the appearance of prostate cancer tissue.

Hormonal therapy:
Treatments that add, block or remove hormones.

Hormone:
A natural chemical produced in one part of the body and released into the blood to trigger or regulate particular functions of the body. Antidiuretic hormone tells the kidneys to slow down urine production.

Impotence:
Also called erectile dysfunction or ED. The inability to get or maintain an adequate enough erection for sexual activity.

Incision:
Surgical cut for entering the body to perform an operation.

Incontinence:
Loss of bladder or bowel control; the involuntary or accidental loss of urine or feces.

Infection:
A condition resulting from the presence of bacteria or other microorganisms.

Inflammation:
Swelling, redness, heat and/or pain produced in the area of the body as a result of irritation, injury or infection.

Intravenous:
Also referred to as IV. Existing or occurring inside a vein.

Invasive:
Having or showing a tendency to spread from the point of origin to adjacent tissue, as some cancers do. Involving cutting or puncturing the skin or inserting instruments into the body.

Ions:
Electrically charged atoms.

IV:
Also referred to as intravenous. Existing or occurring inside a vein.

Kidney:
One of two bean-shaped organs that filter wastes from the blood and discharge these waste products in urine. The kidneys are located on either side at the level of the 12th ribs toward the back. The kidneys send urine to the bladder through tubes called ureters.

Laparoscopic:
Using an instrument in the shape of a tube that is inserted through the abdominal wall to give an examining doctor a view of the internal organs.

Laparoscopic surgery:
Surgery performed with an instrument in the shape of a tube that is inserted through small cuts. Using a small video camera and a few customized instruments, the surgeon can work in many body cavities without dividing skin from muscle thus reducing recovery time and complications.

Liver:
A large, vital organ that secretes bile, stores and filters blood, and takes part in many metabolic functions, for example, the conversion of sugars into glycogen. The liver is reddish-brown, multilobed, and in humans is located in the upper right part of the abdominal cavity.

Lymph:
Fluid containing white cells. It can transport bacteria, viruses and cancer cells.

Lymphadenectomy:
Removal of adjacent lymph nodes.

Lymphnodes:
Small rounded masses of tissue distributed along the lymphatic system most prominently in the armpit, neck and groin areas. Lymph nodes produce special cells that help fight off foreign agents invading the body. Lymph nodes also act as traps for infectious agents.

Malignancy:
A cancerous growth.

Malignant:
A cancerous growth that is likely to grow and spread which can cause serious disablement or death.

Metastasized:
Cancerous tumor that has spread to another part of the body.

Metastatic:
Cancer that has metastasized, in other words, spread to other parts of the body.

MRI:
Also referred to a magnetic resonance imaging. A diagnostic procedure that uses a combination of large magnets, radiofrequencies and a computer to produce detailed images of organs and structures within the body.

Oncologist:
A doctor who specializes in the treatment of cancer.

Orgasm:
The climax of sexual excitement, consisting of intense muscle tightening around the genital area experienced as a pleasurable wave of tingling sensations through parts of the body.

Pathologic:
Relating to disease or arising from disease.

Pathological:
Relating to disease or arising from disease.

Pathology:
The process of a particular disease. Scientific study of the nature, origin, progress and cause of disease.

Pelvic:
Relating to, involving or located in or near the pelvis.

Pelvis:
The bowl-shaped bone that supports the spine and holds up the digestive, urinary, and reproductive organs. The legs connect to the body at the pelvis.

Penile prostheses:
Semirigid or inflatable devices that are implanted into penises to treat impotence.

Penis:
The male organ used for urination and sex.

Percutaneous:
To place or perform a procedure through the skin. No incision (cutting) is necessary.

Perineal:
Related to the area between the anus and the scrotum in males and the area between the anus and the vagina in females.

Perineum:
The area between the anus and the scrotum in males and the area between the anus and the vagina in females.

Probe:
Small device for measuring and testing.

Procreate:
To produce offspring by reproduction.

Prostate:
In men, a walnut-shaped gland that surrounds the urethra at the neck of the bladder. The prostate supplies fluid that goes into semen.

Prostatectomy:
Surgical procedure for the partial or complete removal of the prostate.

Prostatic:
Pertaining to the prostate.

PSA:
Also referred to as prostate-specific antigen. A protein made only by the prostate gland. High levels of PSA in the blood may be a sign of prostate cancer.

PSAtest:
Also referred to as prostate-specific antigen test. A blood test used to help detect prostate cancer.

Pulmonary embolism:
A condition in which a blood clot (called an embolus) travels through the bloodstream and lodges in an artery of the lung. Also called a PE.

Radiation:
Also referred to as radiotherapy. X-rays or radioactive substances used in treatment of cancer.

Radiation therapy:
Also referred to as radiotherapy or radiation. X-rays or radioactive substances used in treatment of cancer.

Radical:
Complete removal.

Radical prostatectomy:
Surgical removal of the prostate and seminal vesicles.

Radioactive:
Relating to or making use of radioactive substances or the radiation they emit.

Radioactivity:
High energy particles emitted by radioactive substances.

Radionuclide:
Radioactive nuclide.

Radiotherapy:
Also referred to as radiation therapy. High-energy rays are often used to damage cancer cells and stop them from growing and dividing.

Rectal:
Relating to, involving or in the rectum.

Rectal ultrasound:
A diagnostic test that uses very high frequency sound waves to produce an image of the rectum.

Rectum:
The lower part of the large intestine, ending in the anal opening.

Regional anesthesia:
Loss of sensation in the region of the body produced by application of an anesthetic agent to all nerves supplying that region.

Resection:
The surgical removal of a portion of a body part.

Retropubic prostatectomy:
Involves the removal of obstructing prostate tissue through a cut below the belly button.

Scrotal:
Relating to the scrotum, the sac of tissue that hangs below the penis and contains the testicles.

Scrotum:
Also referred to as the scrotal sac. The sac of tissue that hangs below the penis and contains the testicles.

Semen:
Also known as seminal fluid or ejaculate fluid. Thick, whitish fluid produced by glands of the male reproductive system, that carries the sperm (reproductive cells) through the penis during ejaculation.

Seminal vesicle:
Two pouch-like glands behind the bladder. They produce a sugar-rich fluid called fructose that provides sperm with a source of energy that helps sperm move. The fluid of the seminal vesicles makes up most of the volume of a man’s ejaculatory fluid, or ejaculate.

Serum:
Clear, watery body fluid.

Sperm:
Also referred to as spermatozoa. Male germ cells (gametes or reproductive cells) that are produced by the testicles and that are capable of fertilizing the female partner’s eggs. Cells resemble tadpoles if seen by the naked eye.

Sphincter:
A round muscle that opens and closes to let fluid or other matter pass into or out of an organ. Sphincter muscles keep the bladder closed until it is time to urinate.

Stage:
Classification of the progress of a disease.

Stent:
With regard to treating ureteral stones, a tube inserted through the urethra and bladder and into the ureter. Stents are used to aid treatment in various ways, such as preventing Stone fragments from blocking the flow of urine.

Stricture:
Abnormal narrowing of a body passage.

Stroma:
The connective tissue that provides the framework of an organ or other anatomical structure rather than carrying out its function.

Suprapubic:
An area of the central lower abdomen above the bony pelvis and overlying the bladder.

Suture:
Surgical seam where a wound has been closed or tissues have been joined.

Sutured:
A wound that has been closed.

Testicle:
Also known as testis. Either of the paired, egg-shaped glands contained in a pouch (scrotum) below the penis. They produce sperm and the male hormone testosterone.

Testosterone:
Male hormone responsible for sexual desire and for regulating a number of body functions.

Tissue:
Group of cells in an organism that are similar in form and function.

Toxicity:
Degree to which something is poisonous.

Transrectal ultrasound:
Also referred to as TRUS. This is a special kind of ultrasound test in which the sound waves are produced by a probe inserted into the rectum. In men, the structures most commonly examined with this test are the prostate, bladder, seminal vesicles and ejaculatory ducts.

Transurethral:
Through the urethra. Several transurethral procedures are used for treatment of BPH. (See TUIP, TUMT, TUNA or TURP.)

Transurethral resection of the prostate:
Also referred to as TURP. Surgical procedure where a lighted tube with an attached electrical loop is inserted through the urethra into the prostate. Serves as a diagnostic and therapeutic role in the treatment of bladder cancer.

Transurethral resection:
Surgery performed with a special instrument inserted through the urethra.

Tumor:
An abnormal mass of tissue or growth of cells.

TURP:
Also referred to as transurethral resection of the prostate. Surgical procedure where a lighted tube with an attached electrical loop is inserted through the urethra into the prostate. Serves as a diagnostic and therapeutic role in the treatment of bladder cancer.

Ultrasonic probe:
Thin, tube-like instrument that generates high frequency sound waves that scan surfaces of tissues/organs to detect abnormalities.

Ultrasound study:
Also referred to as a sonogram. A technique that bounces painless sound waves off organs to create an image of their structure to detect abnormalities.

Umbilicus:
Navel or belly button.

Urate:
A salt of uric acid.

Ureter:
One of two tubes that carry urine from the kidneys to the bladder.

Ureters:
Tubes that carry urine from the kidneys to the bladder.

Urethra:
In males, this narrow tube carries urine from the bladder to the outside of the body and also serves as the channel through which semen is ejaculated. Extends from the bladder to the tip of the penis. In females, this short, narrow tube carries urine from the bladder to the outside of the body.

Urethral:
Relating to the urethra, the tube tha carries urine from the bladder to outside the body.

Urethral stricture: Scarring of tissue that causes narrowing or blockage of the canal leading from the bladder, discharging the urine externally.

Urge:
Strong desire to urinate.

Urgency:
Strong desire to urinate.

Urgency incontinence:
Involuntary loss of urine associated with a sudden strong urge to urinate.

Urinary:
Relating to urine.

Urinary frequency:
Urination eight or more times a day.

Urinary incontinence:
Inability to control urination.

Urinary retention:
Failure to empty the bladder totally.

Urinary tract:
The system that takes wastes from the blood and carries them out of the body in the form of urine. Passageway from the kidneys to the ureters, bladder and urethra.

Urinate:
To release urine from the bladder to the outside. Also referred to as void.

Urination:
The passing of urine.

Urine:
Liquid waste product filtered from the blood by the kidneys, stored in the bladder and expelled from the body through the urethra by the act of urinating (voiding). About 96 percent of which is water and the rest waste products.

Urological surgeon:
A surgeon who specializes in diseases of the male and female urinary systems and the male reproductive system. Also known as a urologist.

Urologist:
A doctor who specializes in diseases of the male and female urinary systems and the male reproductive system.

Vas:
Also referred to as vas deferens. The cordlike structure that carries sperm from the testicle to the urethra.

Vascular:
Having to do with blood vessels.

Vas deferens:
Also referred to as vas. The cordlike structure that carries sperm from the testicle to the ejaculatory duct, whicn in turn carries it to the urethra.

Vein:
Blood vessel that drains blood away from an organ or tissue.

Void:
To urinate, empty the bladder.